A New Man part 24

After a short unintended break A New Man is back. Enjoy the latest installment and be on the look out for more to come.

The internet is loaded with websites to track registered sex offenders now. The most popular ones allow you to put in your address and instantly it will give you a list of offenders in your neighborhood. Jacob knew of both the pro‘s and con‘s of this kind of power given to the masses. Many times, wrongly convicted people or those who have truly reformed can be run out of neighborhoods or even attacked and beaten in lynch mob fashion. He felt no sympathy for those that deserve it but in some cases the punishment didn’t fit the crime. Roger Ericsson seemed such a case.
Roger met Cindy Myles in high school. He was eighteen and she was sixteen. Too bad her father had money and Rogers didn’t. Statutory Rape is a sex crime and thus requires that one register with local police, which Roger has done every time he has moved. But the fact that he lives less than two miles from the Murphy’s and that he currently works for a lawn care and landscaping company in Pine Bluff, which services several homes in Haley’s neighborhood it is likely that he is the same man.
***
How do I expect to find him in a town of nearly forty thousand? He could go start flashing a picture around, but that would more than likely get him noticed as well. But in his two hundred dollar dress shoes, four hundred dollar fur coat Andre didn’t exactly blend in either.
He pulled up to the bar that sat near the river. Knew what the lady at the truck stop meant when she said it was “probably the classiest in town“.
Inside, the tables were lined around a small stage and the bar sat to the back, it would hold about a hundred people and on this Monday evening, at closing time it was still packed.
Andre made his way across the floor to the small bar at the back and sat at one of two empty seats. He felt every eye on him, yet he didn’t care. “What’ll it be?” the old bartender said. The black man wore a white shirt with a black bow tie and a black apron, he looked like a servant and Andre despised him for that. Uncle Tom.
“You got Chevis?”
“I do, but you don’t look like a Chevis drinker. Got Hennessey.”
“What you saying, old man.”
He turned his lips down into a frown and pushed the glass toward him and filled it with Chevis. “Nothing. Don‘t hardly sell it and sold two now.”
“You know someone else drinking Chevis, old man?”
The old man turned his back and placed the bottle back on the shelf.
“Name’s, Blue, and where I come from you show respect to ‘old men’.”
Andre felt his ears, neck and face turn to a beat cherry red. Burning filled his entire head. He bit his bottom lip.
“You know someone else who likes to drink Chevis? Maybe someone new to town? A man named Jacob?”
The old man turned back to Andre and placed his hands on the bar in front of him. He leaned in close and, in almost a whisper, “don’t know anyone by the name Jacob.”
“Is that so?”
Andre noticed something in the mans eyes, he kept darting them over to a young man sitting two stools over, there is a space between them. The young man is covered in tattoos. His deep blue eyes stare at Andre. His stomach turns in knots and he looks at the old man again, Uncle Tom.
“You know anyone by the name Jacob, Charles,” old man asks tattoo man. “Said he may be new in town.”
“Can’t say that I do.” tattoo said. “Whattcha need him for, you know why he would be here?”
Andre sat, couldn’t very well say ‘stole my money, one million’, or ‘he tried to kill me’, or ’he knows I killed two people’. “He’s an old friend, said he was coming here last week, haven’t heard from him, its an emergency.”
“Where from?” tattoo asks
Andre bit his tongue, he wanted so bad to tell all these mother-fuckers where to go. “St. Louis.”
The old man looked at Andre and shook his head. “Don’t ring any bells, mister. Can’t say he would come in here anyway. You see, we don’t take kindly to strangers, ‘specially ones from the city.”

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